Sen. Amy Klobuchar says immigration reform will help fix job crisis

Many senators have been calling for Congress to make big changes to U.S. immigration policy, and Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., has been an active advocate for reform. As a member of the Democratic Party and vice chair of the Congressional joint economic committee, Klobuchar believes that green cards should be given more liberally to foreigners who can drive the science and medicine fields.

In an October 2014 op-ed for The Guardian, the Minnesota senator noted six ways that the federal government can move toward a solution for the current jobs crisis. According to Klobuchar, some 7 million Americans can find only part-time work or are entirely unemployed and, though there has been improvement in the past few years, much more needs to be done. A large part of her six-step solution involves immigration reform.

“Ninety of our Fortune 500 companies were built by immigrants; 200 were built by immigrants or kids of immigrants,” Klobuchar wrote. “Yet while we allow unlimited visas for pro hockey players, we severely limit visas for engineers, doctors and their spouses. The House of Representatives needs to pass comprehensive immigration reform.”

Many Americans may believe that granting green cards to immigrants would mean fewer jobs for U.S. citizens. However, as Klobuchar explained, immigration reform would contribute to significant growth of the national economy, which will actually lead to the creation of more jobs. In fact, a nonpartisan analysis organization has already done the math and calculated that immigration reform would lead to great benefits and profits for the American people.

“The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimates that the bipartisan Senate bill would increase our GDP by 3.3 percent by 2023 and decrease our deficit by $158 billion over 10 years,” Klobuchar wrote.

With the support of senators like Klobuchar, the immigration reform movement is continuing to gain traction and push for real change at the federal and state levels.